Zeppelin Porn: Zeppelin Visits Long Beach

It’s Memorial Day, and I’m not up for doing a full post today. We had a barbecue last night with a bunch of friends, and I’m exhausted. So instead, I thought I’d offer a slight twist on an old favorite. This time, instead of airplane porn, we have Zeppelin porn.

That’s right. Airship Ventures brought their Zeppelin down to Long Beach this past week for flightseeing tours and I was able to hitch a ride on one. What an incredibly cool experience. I’ll have more on it tomorrow, but for now, I’ll leave you with this shot of the Zeppelin (advertising Pixar’s new movie, Up) flying away at the end of our trip.

Zeppelin Blocking the Sun
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15 Comments on "Zeppelin Porn: Zeppelin Visits Long Beach"

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simon.forbes
Member

Hey Cranky. Hate to be pedantic, but shouldn’t it only be called a Zeppelin if it was built in Germany during the early 20th Century, or is this a Hoover-type thing?

Scott
Member

No, Zepplin are still making or planning on making airships in Friedrichshafen
http://www.zeppelinflug.de/seiten/E/default.htm

Brendan
Guest

I just saw that up in San Francisco last week when I was in town. I had no idea that they went all the way to Long Beach! Any pictures from the air Cranky?

oliver
Guest

It is made in Germany. I see it almost every day when they are flying their regular routes over the Bay Area. Wish I could justify the expense to take a ride…

Dan
Member

The ship is a Zeppelin NT. Although it is a semi-rigid airship, and not a rigid airship like a traditional “zeppelin” (such as the Hindenburg), it is made by a successor company to the same firm that was founded by Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin and which built the Hindenburg (and over 100 other zeppelin airships) so it is, in fact, a zeppelin!

simon.forbes
Member

Okay, I stand multiply corrected!!

Zach
Guest

Oooohhh–zeppelin porn! I SO shouldn’t be viewing this at work ;-)

Just kidding…

Dan
Member

@ Zach:

Well I guess that depends on your reaction to zeppelins…

John M.
Guest

This really makes me understand the limitations of lighter-than-air travel. It can only be accomplished in pristinely fine weather. If a thunderstorm had rolled in, or even a moderate Santa Ana wind, you would all have died.

Given their low speeds, I don’t see how any dirigible could be expected to maneuver around a front of even modest size. And they simply don’t have the ability to climb ABOVE the weather.

Despite all the futuristic dreaming, I’m afraid commercially viable dirigible travel will remain in the same realm as commercially viable interplanetary travel.

Dan
Member
@ John M: I am not one of those dreamers who believe rigid airships could ever be a practical means of scheduled transportation… BUT…. at the same time, your comment suggests that zeppelins inherently lack any ability to operate in or around adverse weather, which is simply not the case. The best example is the LZ-127 Graf Zeppelin; over a nine year career, the Graf Zeppelin flew more than a million miles, all over the globe, on 590 flights, carrying over 34,000 passengers, and it did so in and around major weather systems. Naturally, careful and attentive navigation was required… Read more »
Paul Gazis
Guest
Airships have several advantages over heavier-than-air craft. They have potentially limitless endurance, they can hover for a very long time, and IFR operation is a piece of cake. Against this, one must weigh their large size, expense, and low speed. They can fly higher than one might suppose. The German ‘height climbers’ of WWI routinely operated at altitudes above 18,000′ during bombing raids — their counterparts would transponders and clearance into Class A airspace today. The biggest problem facing large airships may be ground handling. You don’t just fire up the engines and taxi out to the runway with an… Read more »
Loron Knowlen
Guest

I saw it yesterday Sunday when it flew over Universal Studios at about 5:40pm. I’m proud to see the Zeppelins back.

John M.
Guest

Not only can you not “just fire up the engines and taxi out to the runway with an 800? long aircraft”, you can’t even LEAVE THE HANGAR if it’s even a little bit breezy out. This totally nullifies any advantages.