3 Links I Love: Politics Edition, Aeroplan, and Interjet Woes

Air Canada, Links I Love

This week’s featured link

Even our willingness to fly is partisanThe Air Current
I know, I know. You’ve heard enough about politics this week, but this is a rare article from The Air Current that’s not behind the paywall. There’s a really interesting analysis here that marries politics with willingness to fly. It may not come as a surprise, but it’s still worth it to see the actual correlation.

Image of the Week: I swear, this is the last political post, but Ryanair has just been tearing it up all week digging at the US election. I recommend scrolling throught he account, because some of it is pretty funny.

Two for the road

Inside Air Canada’s Complicated Effort to Resurrect a Loyalty ProgramSkift
Here’s a look at Air Canada’s effort to bring loyalty back in house. There are some great little stories in here from interviews with Air Canada.

Interjet lacks fuel, cancels flights for two daysPaxEx.aero
Oh boy, here we go again. Interjet is back flying again, but maybe the end is finally near.

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11 comments on “3 Links I Love: Politics Edition, Aeroplan, and Interjet Woes

  1. The “Air Current” story isn’t surprising . Many republican voters to this day despite all the info still think the pandemic isn’t all that bad or it’s still a democratic hoax & therefore they refuse to follow CDC guidelines – ware masks, social distance etc.

    1. Thing is, republicans probably have the edge on this air travel thing. With HEPA filters and the risk of spread being ridiculously low, going on a plane is less dangerous than going to your local supermarket.

    2. Which is why red states have the highest infection and death rates. Oh wait, those with the highest death rates would be found in deep blue states. And there seems to be no correlation between infection rates and lockdowns nor mask mandates. Despite being a frequent flier in normal times, I haven’t set foot on a plane since the end of February. For one thing, such travel is banned by my employer for the time being. Secondly, for leisure travel, I really have no desire to deal with the various hassles that Covid has added to any trip itinerary. And I don’t think that’s a red/blue voter thing, it’s true for everyone. Cranky’s trip to O’ahu sounded like there were so many hoops to jump through that it was not appealing.

      BTW, as a ‘red voter’, I will state that I thoroughly endorse social distancing. As much as possible, in fact. And no, I’ve never met anyone who thinks it’s a hoax. But I meet quite a few who feel that the extreme measures of locking people down should be more selective – such as for the elderly and those with immune system issues.

      1. Lots of social distancing at the BLM perpetual protests/ riots in Portland,Seattle,Atlanta and Chicago. That’s the future all run by Democrats. Reparations for the taking. Pathetic!

  2. The Air Current article is simply outstanding. John did a great job of “marrying” his aerospace connections with Courtney’s data analysis and this article is a product of the strength of the Air Current.

    The data speaks for itself although there will always be people that want to use interpretations of data or their own data to reshape the conversation.

    The airline industry desperately needs people to get back on airplanes – and pay for doing so.

    I don’t really care what party affiliation people are when they open their wallets but to somehow think that there won’t be an enormous cost to decisions on either side is beyond naive.

    Just off the top of my head I have flown more than 20 segments since March; some trips were essential family travel.

    I got covid in Asia before it was ever given a name. This isn’t an academic or political discussion for me.

    1. Tim

      Are you ok (recovered) after having your experience with Covid in Asia?

      I guess you can speak from more experience than many people on this board.

      Stay healthy… we need your analysis and appreciate it!

      1. thanks, Keith.

        I did recover but part of the reason my doctor in the US was led to believe that my case was covid was because I had muscle weakness that lasted long after any other type of viral infection he has seen or that I have had. I had a persistent cough as well. I was not hospitalized. I don’t have any lingering effects.
        Covid is real and anyone that has ever construed that I don’t take covid seriously would be dead wrong.

        That said, there are people that have been much less fortunate than me and others that have been asymptomatic. I know full well that I am somewhere in the middle.

        There are many people who statistically are low risk and can travel. However, no one wants to be the statistical exception. But life is full of risks and people make those choices all the time, usually more automatically than what is being done in the covid environment.

        If the nation’s intent was that no one should travel because there was risk to some, then the U.S. airlines would have been shut down. The U.S. provided financial aid to the airline industry to keep it operating and not to put it in hibernation until covid is eradicated.

        I commend those that choose to travel but I also respect those that choose to stay home. Independence and choice requires not requiring others to fit into our view of the world. In the midst of the heated political climate in the country today, we need to embrace the individualism of all and not draw conclusions base on labels they may wear or others may impose upon them. If the Air Current’s research says that Republicans are more willing to travel, then some people have defined their behavior by a label; others define themselves by defying labels.

        1. Hi Tim,

          Had no idea you recovered from Covid. Hope you are doing well.

          I do know of two families that went through this & all involved recovered. One of those cases I’m aware of may have occurred at JFK while coming through customs, as the island the family was returning from had no known cases at that time.

          1. thanks, Sean.

            as is needed in most things in life and yet what is lacking in most of modern life is balance.

            I know others with similar stories to me.

            Statistics can’t provide balance. That requires reason and common sense. Statistics, accurately interpreted, do help help make objective decisions. Of course, life has a huge subjective factor as well.

            I am grateful for the ability to interact w/ people about travel-related topics here on CF. And I genuinely appreciate your perspectives.

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