3 Links I Love: Farewell Allegiant, Gliding in Hawai’i, the Atlas Crash, Throwing Seats Overboard

Allegiant, Easyjet, Links I Love

This Week’s Featured Link

Maury Gallagher’s Letter to ShareholdersAllegiant
I always look forward to Maury’s letter to shareholders, and it’s sad this will be the last. As always, it does not disappoint with some interesting insights not only at the airline but in the world of pilot hiring as well.

Video of the Week

Have you ever wanted to take a boat/plane between islands? You might get that chance. Hawaiian has invested in Regent with the hope of using the seaglider which floats just above the water using ground effect to fly along. I have absolutely no idea if this will work or if it makes sense, but it’s unique. (Video via Regent)

Two for the Road

Legacy of a Lie: The crash of Atlas Air flight 3591Admiral Cloudberg/Medium
I hadn’t delved into full details of what happened in the Atlas crash in Houston, and this is quite the damning report taking aim at one of the pilots. As always, keep in mind, it’s never just one factor.

easyJet to Remove Seats to Curb Staff ShortageAirways Mag
Increasingly desperate moves like this will become the norm as airlines try to squeeze as many flights as they can out of their fleets and crews to match demand.

6 comments on “3 Links I Love: Farewell Allegiant, Gliding in Hawai’i, the Atlas Crash, Throwing Seats Overboard

  1. Regent’s choice to make a ground effect vehicle rather than a traditional airplane is at least partially a regulatory arbitrage around the excessive waitlist for FAA review of new planes:

    “ One startup decided to make an electric sea glider instead of a commuter plane because the FAA is slam-packed with applications and won’t review new ones for years. Sea glider approvals go through a different department with a shorter line. Better batteries and electric motors kicked off a sprint that will start to see fruition in the late 2020s – assuming some startups live through the FAA process.”

    https://austinvernon.site/blog/transportationoildemand.html

  2. Re: Atlas Accident.

    Conrad Jules Aska should have rested his hands over the throttles while holding the speed brake lever. This allows one to maintain positive thrust control with forearm placement over idle thrust levels (away from the TOGA buttons) and positive speed brake control by way of hand placement. It is frustrating to consider how Pilot Aska was hired and how weak pilots may not be dealt with more forthrightly. Persons who hold a protected status can claim that status for special treatments to compensate any individual problems. Pilot instructors receive discipline letters for unsubstantiated complaints by protected status pilots who fail a check rides. Atlas FO Aska previously alleged discrimination when his individual pilots skills were found lacking. There is so much happening in flight training that cannot be openly discussed because of the political nature and added emphasis of unsubstantiated claims of unfair treatment. HR diciplines flight department instructors instead of examining the ability and responsibility of pilots to demonstrate and maintain their individual skills sets. All HR complaints by failing pilots are documented against flight training department personnel.

  3. Admiral Cloudberg on Medium does such a great job with his accident write ups. Definitely worth following. I discovered him a few years ago and he does not disappoint.

  4. Considering how funky the trades are in Hawaii, I’m not sure how flying low to the water will translate in terms of flight comfort…

    1. …or, in other words, people like me who have sea sickness issues better get a prescription patch before even considering this.

      Many years ago, one of our vendors took us on a deep-sea fishing trip, after which my nickname around the office as “Chumley”. It wasn’t good.

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