Cranky on the Web: Putting My Adventure to Shame, Saving Connections, MAX Return Worries

Cranky on the Web, Hawaiian

Around Hawai‘i and Back: A Pass Traveler’s Journey to Fly Our Entire Neighbor Island Network in One DayHawaiian Airlines Mana’o
Remember my day flying to all the Hawaiian 717 stations? Well, one Hawaiian employee decided to top that and include all the ‘Ohana by Hawaiian stations as well. Of course, this meant he had to backtrack through Honolulu… A LOT. But he was able to hit all the stations in one day that made my look like a walk in the park. Alex — who is not the same Alex that flew with me — actually used to work for Cranky Concierge a couple years back before he got his job with Hawaiian. The company loved what he did, so they wrote it up on their blog. Enjoy the read.

United has a new tool to help you make tight connections. They say it’s saved 50,000 missed flights. The Washington Post
United talked about its ConnectionSaver tool on its earnings call this week, and people are taking notice. Since I wrote about this in detail a few months ago, the Post reached out to me for comment.

How Will Airlines Handle the Return of Boeing’s 737 Max 8?AdWeek
This is a really good look at the issues that will face the airlines when the 737 MAX starts flying again. It requires free registration to read the whole article.

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8 comments on “Cranky on the Web: Putting My Adventure to Shame, Saving Connections, MAX Return Worries

  1. So United came out with a tool to use because they run tight connections or have delays that cause passengers to miss flights and they are marketing it like it’s the travelers fault and they are coming to the rescue to save them?????

    Also known as we screwed up your travel plans and you missed your connection and we don’t want a lot of extra costs to get you to your destination so we are trying this out.

    Whatever works I guess.

    1. If they didn’t make connections tight they would lose customers to competitors who do since total travel time is the second biggest factor in most flight purchase decisions.

  2. Not going to register for a “free” subscription to a website to read one article–I already get enough spam.

    1. You can register with a fake email address. (You are able to view the article without having to confirm the registered email.)

      1. Thanks for the tip, although the article wasn’t really worth the hassle of making up all of the bogus info required.

      2. Although I remember watching the cockpit camera video shown in the main cabin on a DC-10 during a takeoff from ORD and thinking, this would be a helluva show if something goes wrong.

  3. Regarding the article ‘How Will Airlines Handle the Return of Boeing’s 737 Max 8?’ – AdWeek and the following quote:
    “There’s no cure for a controversy like this better than the planes being in the sky,” he said. “It won’t vanish as much as it will recede.”
    My prediction is once the MAX 8 flies 2 months (likely less) incident free, no one will remember or care about the MAX 8 issues. Most react only to the latest news that pops up on their cell phone.
    60% of the traveling public don’t even know what makes a plane fly and 95% of them don’t know the model number or manufacturer of the type of AC they are flying on.
    Those of us who read this blog are the only people who will follow this issue after the planes are flying again (and maybe a few Boeing/Airbus stockholders).

  4. Thanks for the tip, although the article wasn’t really worth the hassle of making up all of the bogus info required.

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