The Good and the Bad of Etihad’s A380 First Class Apartments (Guest Post)

It’s been a few years since you last heard from Geoff Fischer on the blog. But after tackling some seriously difficult challenges, including flying First Class on both Cathay Pacific and Emirates, he’s back again. This time, thanks to a now-depleted trove of American AAdvantage miles, Geoff took a ride in the Etihad A380 First Class Apartments… twice. While he had plenty of nice things to say, he was able to dig deep to find some actual faults in what many consider to be one of the most incredible onboard products to grace the skies.

We’ve set this trip report up a bit differently than most. So read through, enjoy, and let me know if you’d like to see more from Geoff.


When Etihad began flying its A380 with over-the-top First Class “Apartments” in late 2014, they rocketed to the top of my Must-Fly list. Their design goal seems to have been to create the preeminent First Class in the skies, an experience that would one-up their U.A.E. rival, Emirates.

Located at the front of the upper deck in an ultra-wide single aisle 1-1 layout, Etihad gives nine First Class passengers significantly more space than Emirates, Singapore and pretty much all other carriers, which use a 1-2-1 double aisle configuration for 12-16 suites or seats in the same area.

Etihad A380 Relaxing

The Apartments are huge walled enclaves with doors that slide shut at the aisle, containing both a standard seat and a long bench that transforms into a bed. Inside, there’s a vanity, a minibar, a 24” flat screen TV and more storage space than you have stuff to store. The cabin also includes versions of two Emirates signature features, a lounge area and a shower. And to top it all off, Etihad has matched Turkish Airways by having an onboard chef personally prepare meals for passengers in the Apartments.

So when American Airlines recently announced that mileage redemption rates will increase for many partner award flights effective today, I decided to use my remaining stash of AAdvantage miles to see if Etihad has indeed set a new standard for luxury travel.

In my small sample size of two flights, New York/JFK-Abu Dhabi and Abu Dhabi back to London/Heathrow, there was a lot to like – from the spaciousness of the bed that was several inches longer than my 6’4” frame, to the highest quality wine glasses and champagne flutes I’ve ever seen on an airplane and the customized approach to meal ordering and service.

Only one was a contender for my personal “Best Flight Ever” (which I previously conferred on a Cathay Pacific SFO-HKG flight back in 2011). Surprisingly, it was the shorter and second leg from Abu Dhabi to London, and I didn’t even bother taking a shower or using the lounge on that flight

Some of the difference between the two flights was luck-of-the-draw. Things like my rapport with the Flight Attendants and a lighter passenger load had a big impact. Another important element was that on Abu Dhabi-London I had one of the four Apartments where the seat is located at the window instead of at the aisle (and one of only two window seats that face forward). The difference in terms of privacy is significant compared to the aisle-adjacent seat I was in from New York to Abu Dhabi, as were the much better views out the windows.

It may have also been that by the second flight I had gotten over my disappointment about some of the areas where Etihad lags. For one, their version of an onboard lounge is a far cry from the Emirates bar. It’s a table located right outside the galley where all First and Business class meals are prepared. There is no bar, no bartender and it’s not a place I imagine that gets much use. Also, the shower is cramped and awkward to comfortably use compared to its Emirates counterpart. And there are a few small oversights, like how the personal closet in the Apartment can barely fit an overcoat — and cannot fit a second hangar with your clothes if you choose to change into the provided pajamas. (I know, I know. Some serious 1% problems…)

Another big miss in my opinion is the largely undifferentiated ground experience for First and Business class passengers. At both JFK and Abu Dhabi, there were only minimal exclusive touches for First Class passengers; nothing like the wonderful Lufthansa First Class Terminal in Frankfurt or Singapore Airlines’s Private Room. (Etihad says that a dedicated First Class lounge will open in May in Abu Dhabi, but they’ve apparently been promising it for quite a while.)

But all that said, let’s be very clear that the Etihad Apartments are an excellent way to fly. The personal space of the Apartment is unrivaled, and that is more meaningful to most fliers than a bigger shower or a fancier lounge. I’ve had more opulent food and wine on other flights, but Etihad’s offerings were solid.

Flight attendant service ranged from very good to excellent, and on both flights the chefs were genuinely eager to customize meals to my tastes.

If anything, the biggest regret for fliers may be that Etihad only has five A380s in their fleet and five more on order, meaning that the Apartments only fly between a select group of cities, currently Abu Dhabi to JFK, London, and Sydney with service to Mumbai and Melbourne starting later this year. (Compare that to a stunning *75* A380s in the Emirates fleet, with 30 more on order.)

The Trip In Photos

After an easy ride out to JFK in a complimentary SUV (which Etihad provides to all Business and First Class passengers), there was a bit of a wait at security since Etihad flights aren't Pre Check eligible. But soon enough I was having lunch at the bar of Etihad's combined lounge for Business and First Class. The lamb biryani was wonderful, as were the craft cocktails.

After an easy ride out to JFK in a complimentary SUV (which Etihad provides to all Business and First Class passengers), there was a bit of a wait at security since Etihad flights aren’t Pre Check eligible. But soon enough I was having lunch at the bar of Etihad’s combined lounge for Business and First Class. The lamb biryani was wonderful, as were the craft cocktails.


Etihad 102 Lv JFK 235p Arr Abu Dhabi 1227p (next day)
New York/JFK: Gate 47, Runway 4L, Depart 5m Late
Abu Dhabi: Gate 303, Runway 31R, Arrive 12m Late
A6-APA, Airbus A380-800, Standard Etihad colors, 8/9 Apartments occupied (Residence empty)
Apartment 2H
Flight Time 12h3m

I was one of the first to board, and although this wasn't my first rodeo, there was a lot to take in and a lot of unique aspects to the Apartment to get familiarized with. Here's the view from the window looking into the aisle of row 2. Notice the tray with the large champagne flute, pre-departure snack and welcome letter from the crew. Soon after, they also came by to offer Arabic coffee and dates.

I was one of the first to board, and although this wasn’t my first rodeo, there was a lot to take in and a lot of unique aspects to the Apartment to get familiarized with. Here’s the view from the window looking into the aisle of row 2. Notice the tray with the large champagne flute, pre-departure snack and welcome letter from the crew. Soon after, they also came by to offer Arabic coffee and dates.

The schedule for dining was up to each passenger, and I decided to eat about an hour after takeoff. The red lentil soup and smoked duck breast appetizers were ok. The chef suggested I customize my entree, and so I chose the rib eye with mashed potatoes, green beans and garlic herb butter on the side. I sampled several of the red wines and admired the hefty glassware that Etihad uses. Dessert was an apricot and almond tart with warm vanilla sauce that was great.

The schedule for dining was up to each passenger, and I decided to eat about an hour after takeoff. The red lentil soup and smoked duck breast appetizers were ok. The chef suggested I customize my entree, and so I chose the rib eye with mashed potatoes, green beans and garlic herb butter on the side. I sampled several of the red wines and admired the hefty glassware that Etihad uses. Dessert was an apricot and almond tart with warm vanilla sauce that was great.

After dining I figured I'd head back to the bar to socialize and have a wee dram of the Glenlivet Single Malt. But the "bar" turned out to be a lonely table just outside the galley where the flight attendants were busy doing the Business Class service. On Emirates there's a bartender to chat with, but here I was alone for five minutes and then gave up and went back to my Apartment.

After dining I figured I’d head back to the bar to socialize and have a wee dram of the Glenlivet Single Malt. But the “bar” turned out to be a lonely table just outside the galley where the flight attendants were busy doing the Business Class service. On Emirates there’s a bartender to chat with, but here I was alone for five minutes and then gave up and went back to my Apartment.

My bed had been made up while I was at the bar, and it was looking pretty comfy. The benefit of the aisle seat configuration in Row 2 is that in bed your head is by the window, where it's quietest. You can see in the picture there's a second IFE controller by the bed. Also (not shown) there's a second plug for your noise cancelling headphones.

My bed had been made up while I was at the bar, and it was looking pretty comfy. The benefit of the aisle seat configuration in Row 2 is that in bed your head is by the window, where it’s quietest. You can see in the picture there’s a second IFE controller by the bed. Also (not shown) there’s a second plug for your noise cancelling headphones.

I closed the doors to my Apartment and fired up a few episodes of "Louie". The flat screen pivots out on an arm for easy viewing. The blue mood lighting in the ceiling with Etihad's geometric pattern was a cool touch.

I closed the doors to my Apartment and fired up a few episodes of “Louie”. The flat screen pivots out on an arm for easy viewing. The blue mood lighting in the ceiling with Etihad’s geometric pattern was a cool touch.

The time passed more quickly than I expected. I managed almost six hours of sleep before finally waking up to some tea, and then a full English breakfast. I had asked to reserve the shower to use 90 minutes before landing, and the crew made sure it was ready for me. The shower is in the smaller of the two lavatories, and just getting changed was difficult in the tight space.

The time passed more quickly than I expected. I managed almost six hours of sleep before finally waking up to some tea, and then a full English breakfast. I had asked to reserve the shower to use 90 minutes before landing, and the crew made sure it was ready for me. The shower is in the smaller of the two lavatories, and just getting changed was difficult in the tight space.

Inside the actual shower, it was fairly similar to what I remember from Emirates. They provide bath gel, shampoo and conditioner. You have to be inside the shower with the door shut to start the water, but it was only cold for a split second before becoming nice and warm. The water pressure was good. I used about four of my five minutes of allotted water. It definitely was refreshing after the long flight, and allowed me to hit the ground running when I arrived at Abu Dhabi.

Inside the actual shower, it was fairly similar to what I remember from Emirates. They provide bath gel, shampoo and conditioner. You have to be inside the shower with the door shut to start the water, but it was only cold for a split second before becoming nice and warm. The water pressure was good. I used about four of my five minutes of allotted water. It definitely was refreshing after the long flight, and allowed me to hit the ground running when I arrived at Abu Dhabi.


After a whirlwind 72 hours in Dubai and Abu Dhabi, I was back for seconds. In the Lounge I managed to squeeze in both a complimentary massage and a straight razor shave, which made for a nice prelude to an 8 hour flight. When I got to the gate, it turned out that the same aircraft (A6-APA) would be taking me to London that had brought me in from JFK. I love the uniquely shaped Abu Dhabi control tower rising above the wing in this picture taken at sunrise.

After a whirlwind 72 hours in Dubai and Abu Dhabi, I was back for seconds. In the Lounge I managed to squeeze in both a complimentary massage and a straight razor shave, which made for a nice prelude to an 8 hour flight. When I got to the gate, it turned out that the same aircraft (A6-APA) would be taking me to London that had brought me in from JFK. I love the uniquely shaped Abu Dhabi control tower rising above the wing in this picture taken at sunrise.


Etihad 19 Lv AUH 812a Arr LHR 1230p
Abu Dhabi: Gate 33, Runway 31L, Depart 12m Late
London/Heathrow: Gate 413, Runway 27L, Arrive 25m Late
A6-APA, Airbus A380-800, Standard Etihad colors, 6/9 Apartments occupied (Residence empty)
Apartment 4A
Flight Time 7h46m

For this flight I scored one of the prime window seats in Row 4, and I felt a big difference in privacy and quiet. It was also easier to look out the windows.

For this flight I scored one of the prime window seats in Row 4, and I felt a big difference in privacy and quiet. It was also easier to look out the windows.

The only slight downside to the window seat suites is that your head is at the aisle in bed mode. But on this daytime flight, I wasn't as focused on sleep -- and mostly watched movies and read from bed.

The only slight downside to the window seat suites is that your head is at the aisle in bed mode. But on this daytime flight, I wasn’t as focused on sleep — and mostly watched movies and read from bed.

The first meal started with chickpea soup and then a beautiful large piece of Balik salmon, before my entree of mushroom risotto that was truly restaurant quality. The chocolate hazelnut tart was an excellent finish. Before landing I had the "signature steak sandwich" which was good, although they had run out of the french fries meant to accompany it. For a sweet finale I had chocolate and strawberry ice cream... and one more glass of the Pinot Noir, and tried to enjoy my last minutes of First Class bliss before touching down at Heathrow.

The first meal started with chickpea soup and then a beautiful large piece of Balik salmon, before my entree of mushroom risotto that was truly restaurant quality. The chocolate hazelnut tart was an excellent finish. Before landing I had the “signature steak sandwich” which was good, although they had run out of the french fries meant to accompany it. For a sweet finale I had chocolate and strawberry ice cream… and one more glass of the Pinot Noir, and tried to enjoy my last minutes of First Class bliss before touching down at Heathrow.

Booking Details
Etihad’s website makes it relatively easy to check award availability, though flexibility with travel dates is critical. I originally intended to fly over New Years, but Etihad did not open any First Class award seats from JFK to Abu Dhabi, even when there were unsold seats the day before departure. I then shifted my sights to late January, and was able to grab an award seat just after it became available, two weeks before the outbound flight.

Booking also required Skype calls to American Airlines’ reservations line in Australia, because US-based AA agents can’t always ticket Etihad First and Business class awards. It’s not clear if this is a glitch or intentional – but seemed yet another reason to book and fly it now, in case it is a loophole that gets closed.

The good news is that American does not charge high fees for Etihad redemptions. The JFK-Abu Dhabi one way ticket cost 90,000 AAdvantage miles (which climbed to 115,000 today) and a mere $7 in taxes. For variation, and to avoid the 3am Abu Dhabi-JFK departure time, I booked my return on Etihad Abu Dhabi-London with an overnight stopover and a connecting flight to the US the next day on British Airways in First Class on their A380. That return ticket cost 90,000 miles (again, climbed to 115,000 today) and $300 (and could have cost less if I had flown AA from LHR instead of BA). The $75 charge for ticketing award travel less than 21 days in advance was waived because of my AA Gold status.

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17 Comments on "The Good and the Bad of Etihad’s A380 First Class Apartments (Guest Post)"

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A
Guest

I like the trip report format, especially the details on how to book that award flight. Seeing the opulence of those “apartments” reminds me of what operators were doing with the 747 in its early years. One wonders if we are living in a slim window of excess with the middle east carriers…

DDS
Guest

Loved this trip report as well. Keep them coming!

drybean
Member

Valuable information…sign him up!

JoeMart
Guest
Thanks for taking the time to share an in-depth look experiencing this product. Bells and whistles are all there. Attention to detail is not. The catering reminded me hospital offerings for the doctor’s lounge, not Joel Robuchon recipes. Why would a marble rich cut such as a rib-eye need a side of butter? Why no master patissier prepared desserts? The premium price requires a reflection in the menu. How about Kobe beef, Madagascar giant shrimp, South African lobster, Japanese home grown fruit selection, Kopi Luwak espressos, Krug 1996 Clos D’Ambonnay champagne? Finally, an on-board cook cannot elevate food without herbs… Read more »
David SF eastbay
Member

Well, either the dinner roll came with a bite taken out of it or someone forgot to take a photo first….lol

LT_DT
Guest

Or, that class of service come with its own food taster.

jaybru
Member

For context, had you paid cash for the JFK-Abu Dhabi roundtrip, the US dollar price would have been?

Regardless, thanks for the post.

Darkwater
Guest

A quick search on Etihad’s website shows about $22K round trip, if taken in the next few weeks.

Darkwater
Guest

And oddly enough, it doesn’t seem like there’s a premium compared to the nonstop on Jet Airways’ 777 or connecting from Aer Lingus or American somewhere in Europe.

davidp627
Member

I’ve never flown on a plane with a sleeper section or ‘apartment.’ I’m a little surprised that they are present given that clear air turbulence seems to be occurring with greater regularity. Are there systems in place that address this? I assume that you are wearing some sort of restraint even while sleeping?

Msample
Guest

The lack of Pre Check – is that going to change? That seems like a big miss if you’re shelling out $22K.

GHH
Guest

I liked the format with detailed notes adding context to each image. I’m surprised it was only $300 for the BA portion which charges high taxes and fees (my experience it’s closer to $900 for each ticket) that is not included in the reward redemption.

Geoff Fischer
Guest
Thanks for all the feedback and hope it was a good read. To answer some of the questions — yes, in addition to the second IFE controller and second headphone plug for the bed, there is also a second seatbelt to keep you safe in turbulence. The belt goes over the blanket so that the flight attendants can see it if the seatbelt sign comes on, just like any other seat. It fit just fine and wasn’t disruptive to my sleep. Regarding the food, I agree that the meals on JFK-AUH were a little less “fancy” than I expected. The… Read more »
Vanessa
Guest

The space in these First Apartments does look incredible, but interesting to hear about the closet space and the bar. If there’s no bartender I can’t imagine wanting to sit there for long. On Emirates and Qatar Airways I have always enjoyed chatting with the bartender but noticed most passengers just stick to their seats. For me the food on Singapore Airlines is still unrivalled – I do think the food is a huge part of the experience.

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